Monthly Archives: February 2011

14 02, 2011

Strangers in the Night….Exchanging Glances

By |2011-02-14T14:09:10-08:00February 14th, 2011|mediation, Pyschological Research and negotiations|Comments Off on Strangers in the Night….Exchanging Glances

Did you know that a complete stranger may understand the true intent of your spouse’s messages as much as you? If you are anything like me, having been married for close to 20 years, I sometimes feel that I should be able to understand the intent of my wife’s potentially ambiguous clues as to her wishes. However, research has reaffirmed what most married men jokingly know – spouses don’t have a clue as to what their spouses are saying. So on Valentine's day, talking about marital miscommunications seems like a good idea -- before we get into a "miscommunication."

11 02, 2011

Faking Remorse, Can you?

By |2011-02-11T10:24:39-08:00February 11th, 2011|Pyschological Research and negotiations|Comments Off on Faking Remorse, Can you?

In mediation, there are frequent occasions where a party may feel genuine remorse and apologize for his or her actions. However, in the cynical world of litigation, everyone doubts when the other side acts remorseful. How can you tell when a person genuinely feels remorse? Canadian researchers think they have the answer.

11 02, 2011

Cutting Your Losses

By |2011-02-11T06:52:52-08:00February 11th, 2011|mediation, negotiation|Comments Off on Cutting Your Losses

The key to making a smart decision at mediation is to know when to let go and when to push forward – when to settle and when to continue the litigation. This decision, as simple as it sounds is actually very complex.

7 02, 2011

You Dare to Bring Me This News, Messenger. This is Sparta!!!!!!!!!!!!

By |2019-08-01T23:30:25-07:00February 7th, 2011|mediation history|Comments Off on You Dare to Bring Me This News, Messenger. This is Sparta!!!!!!!!!!!!

In some sense, mediators are simply messengers in a war of the parties. They send and interpret a message from one side to the other. And we all know sometimes what can happen to the messenger. Well I thought I might briefly look at the origin of the phrase, "Don't shoot [or kill] the messenger."