Monthly Archives: March 2011

24 03, 2011

Independence: Seeing the Forest Through the Trees

By |2019-03-14T01:06:54-07:00March 24th, 2011|mediation history, Pyschological Research and negotiations|Comments Off on Independence: Seeing the Forest Through the Trees

One of the advantages of having a mediator is the fact that the mediator is neutral and not so closely connected to the case. A recent study has confirmed this concept by showing that people who solve problems for others are more creative than those who are thinking of solutions for themselves.

22 03, 2011

Regret Nothing, But if You Must, Then Compare To Other's Regrets

By |2011-03-22T05:33:12-07:00March 22nd, 2011|mediation, Pyschological Research and negotiations|Comments Off on Regret Nothing, But if You Must, Then Compare To Other's Regrets

I saw an interesting quote the other day that made me think about how people deal with the past and the future. The quote by Fulton Oursler, a playwright and editor, is "“Many of us crucify ourselves between two thieves - regret for the past and fear of the future.” I thought to myself do I have regret for things that happened in the past, and I am happy to say that I don't feel that I want to wind back the clock and do something over again. As to the future, I am always worried about the future -- as we all are-- and try to not crucify myself over things I can't control. But sometimes in that light, I fail. But this quote also made me think that in mediation it is often the case that people are crucifying themselves between the regret for the past and the fear of the future.

17 03, 2011

How to Create the Luck of the Irish in Negotiations

By |2011-03-17T12:36:07-07:00March 17th, 2011|negotiation, Pyschological Research and negotiations|Comments Off on How to Create the Luck of the Irish in Negotiations

Some people have all the luck! But how do those people get that luck? Well since today is St. Patrick’s Day, and we have the luck of the Irish behind us, I thought I would investigate how we can get the luck of the Irish in negotiations and life.